Assistive Technology Spotlight: Make sure to plan an accessible garden layout and consider choosing low maintenance plants

purple flowersThere is the saying that goes, “April showers bring May flowers,” and by now many of you are thinking about getting your garden and flower beds started.

This is also the time to be thinking about assistive technology that can help you get the job done. There are many ways that gardening can be adapted to fit the needs of individuals with a wide range of disabilities.

A partial list includes:

  • Raised beds (varying heights)
  • Rolling work carts
  • Ergonomic tools
  • Carry small tools and seeds in a carpenter’s apron
  • Automatic water systems
  • Mulch to reduce weeding
  • Vertical gardening

Photos and layout ideas appear on the AgrAbility PA’s Pinterest page.

Stand 'n PlantOne unique type of assistive technology that can be used in your garden is called a standย ‘n plant planter.ย This tube-shaped device allows you to place plants into the ground without bending or kneeling.

To operate, put the bottom end of the tool into the ground where you want the plant to go and then place the transplant into the top opening. The plant slides down the tube and into the ground. The next step is to squeeze the handle and lift the tool up away from the plant. The dirt will fall back into place around the plant while you move on to the next row!

Learn more about the Stand ‘n Plant.

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